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mattedmonds

Rounding Question

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Posted (edited)

I created my first subdivision sculpted object below, then converted it to a quad mesh and want to add a small fillet on all the sharp edges. I tried using the sharpness controls in the subdivision tools, but cant carefully control the rounding the way I would like. Is there a way to consistently round the edges to a set radius, now that I've quad-i-fied the object?

I still have the original sub-D object too,, if someone can easily explain the process.
Thanks.

 

image.thumb.png.ee1bd32617355d2267514fcf370cd8a6.png

Edited by mattedmonds

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Don't know if this qualifies.  Backsaved to 8.0   If this is what you want, it was not easy.  I didn't use the rounding tools at all.

Mostly used the loft tool.  First, separated the divots from the panel.  Rebuilt the panel without the divots.   then had to figure out how to get a round on the nonplanar object.

I Couldn't do it directly, so I trimmed out a section using the border of the top and extruded circle.  once, I had that, Rebuilt the leftover panels to remove extra points (I don't like the way 7.x doesn't allow deleting topology the way 6.x did)  From there, I lofted the sides to the top.   then deleted the outer rings of the divots and lofted the bottoms to the top of the panel.  Stitched everything together. (stitching these kinds of panels is very forgiving.)

It doesn't make a lot of sense.  But if it is what you want, it worked.  Hopefully, somebody else can figure out a smarter way.  If not, I could make a vid.

 

Panel-Rebuild.fmz

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Posted (edited)

The main problem is edge-flow in your SubD model. Ideally, you should try to keep to a regular grid layout of your edges, so quad shapes rather than triangles. The depressions in the top should have an even boundary to the edges. With good edge-flow, you should not need to apply fillets as the interpolation between edges should accomplish that for you.

Some reference for SubD modelling... Although the samples look like Blender this site should help a bit https://topologyguides.com/.

Alternatively, one of the best references for subdivision modelling can be found here

https://gumroad.com/vaughan3d?query=topology workbook&sort=page_layout $25 each but worth far more than that in the improvements you will see in your modelling.

William Vaughan has tried to make the reference as software agnostic as possible but most of the examples werecreated in Modo.

The ebooks are also a good reference if you use T-Splines in Autodesk's Fusion 360. Most Cad applications have now embraced subdivision modelling.

 

Edited by bbuxton

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@¢hris £und

Thanks for what looks like a lot of work to help create a solution! Looks pretty good :) We'll see if i can follow your directions to achieve similar results.

@bbuxtonSo how would you go about building the cage to more cleanly subdivide to create the smoo th organic depressions, while at the same time creating consistent edge rounding on the sides and back? Here' a screenshot of the cage model (note the numbered areas and not coplaner):  

image.png

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Matt,  I don't know if those qualify as directions.    @bbuxton is right about sub-Ds though.   Quads work far better.   Instead of triangles, use quads that have very close points/segments to mimic a triangle.

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One way is an inside to outside approach. So start with triangle 1 draw a box over it and make it subD. 

offset the faces to give you some borders around the edges and your 4 sided triangles. Move the points around to get the form you want.

The width of the subD borders should approximate the desired fillet radius. So the closer loops are the smaller the apparent fillet in subD.

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On 5/22/2020 at 7:04 AM, mattedmonds said:

I get the big idea of what you're suggesting... makes sense. What do you mean by "draw a box over it" 

The easiest approach is to start with a box. You offset edges, then move the points to pull the shape to match your design.

I'm not a great teacher but William Vaugan's ebooks are brilliant and will help you understand what you are doing.

Another great SubD modeller is Glen Southern he has lots of videos on YouTube using Silo 3D. More recently videos doing the same thing in VR using Occulus medium.

Generally, the software does not matter. The concepts apply just as well to FormZ, Fusion 360 or a plethora of CAD applications that have implemented SubD.

 

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