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davidorth

Intel UHD 620 graphics?

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Hope I'm not repeating a question here.  I'm looking at a new laptop and it seems the graphic specs are much lower than my old one (old has NVIDIA GeForce GT 750M).  I'm looking at a Dell Inspiron with 16Ram, solid state drive, Intel UHD 620 graphics with shared memory.  I don't use FormZ a great deal or with very big files, so I don't need it to be super fast.  But of course it has to work.  Anyone have a thought about this for FormZ and RenderZone?

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I don't think so.  I just use RenderZone in RayTrace mode.  Excuse my ignorance.  Is Vray part of RenderZone?  Or an add on?  I don't use any add ons.

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Posted (edited)

Vray was added last year as a rendering engine that can be used in place of Renderzone.  Renderzone was added as a default rendering engine about 3 decades ago and has not kept up with the current quality of engines available for all other modeling programs.  Maxwell is another option that provides far superior images.  Both of these can now be seamlessly added to the core of Form.z but they must be purchased separately. 

The reason I asked was because these engines run faster on a GPU which is where all rendering engines seem to be headed.  If you run Vray you will need a better graphics card.

Edited by Andrew West
spelling

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You may not deal with large files right now, but wouldn't it be nice to be able to actually navigate them easily when they do eventually show up?

Even if just using RenderZone and the default Shaded rendering in FormZ, I would NOT recommend any integrated graphics Intel offers.  You will be much better served by a computer with a dedicated GPU with as much VRAM as you can afford.  Nvidia GTX 1060 6gb on the low end, and a newer RTX 2080 on the higher end.  Computers last longer if you don't buy the cheapest ones available.  Higher specs justify higher prices when you can get a much longer useful life out of them. 

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Thanks All, I appreciate the expert comments and you've gotten me thinking in a different direction.  Could I ask about another configuration from Dell?  What do you think of this gaming laptop?  I don't game, but I've heard that they often have the specs a designer requires.  Your thoughts?

Dell G5 15 Gaming Laptop
9th Generation Intel® Core™ i5-9300H (8MB Cache, up to 4.1 GHz, 4 cores)
Windows 10 Home 64-bit English
NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 1650 4GB GDDR5
8GB, 2x4GB, DDR4, 2666MHz
128GB M.2 PCIe NVMe Solid State Drive (Boot) + 1TB 5400 rpm 2.5" SATA Hard Drive (Storage)

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Looks pretty good.  Gaming laptops are great for designers who do not require a real workstation laptop and the Quadro graphics they usually offer.  (FormZ doesn't)

One upgrade I would suggest is to spend $170 or so (on Amazon) on a 1TB M.2 PCIe NVMe SSD drive for Boot and storage and get rid of the 5400 rpm spin drive.  Those old spin drives are just too slow for modern times, especially when Solid state drives are so much faster and affordable.  Even a normal 2.5" non NVMe SSD drive would be a worthy single drive upgrade on your new laptop.  NVMe is faster, but compared to that old spin drive, a regular SATA SSD would still be a huge upgrade.  SSD's are also more reliable, especially in a laptop that moves around.   

Does Dell let you order a laptop without a spin drive?  You don't want it.

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Okay, a bit late. I have an old Intel Iris graphicscard which works without problems for FormZ, but i do only modeling in FZ. When i work in Modo with the complete scene the graphicscard can sometimes be a bottleneck. Other than that i would recommend a faster card depending on the other software you use.

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Hope I'm not annoying anyone here.  The laptop search continues.  Taking Justin's advice about solid state seriously.  And so I found this:

Inspiron 15 7000
Intel® Core™ i7-8565U Processor (8MB Cache, up to 4.6 GHz)
Windows 10 Home 64bit English
NVIDIA® GeForce® MX250 with 2GB GDDR5 graphics memory
16GB, 16GBx1, DDR4 2666MHz
Intel Optane Memory H10 32GB with 512GB Solid State Storage

 

I little more than I want to spend, but how does this look?  Especially any comments on the NVIDIA. ( I currently have an old NVDIA GeForce GT 750M version 369.09.  Will the MX250 be a serious downgrade?) As you can tell I'm not a power user, but I do some interesting art/craft work that requires the modeling of complex shapes.  I especially use the FMZ unfolding tool and RenderZone.  Perhaps I will add Vray someday.  Speed is not really a deal breaker for me.

 

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Posted (edited)

Hi David,

This new MX250 is certainly much more powerful than your old 750m, and that might be enough for you.  However, I truly believe that you should buy the best you can afford for a longer lasting machine, that you are less likely to grow out of.  If you can look beyond Dell, you will likely find a better machine for the same price or even lower.  Amazon and Newegg both have some great deals, and is easy to deal with for warranty and returns as well.  Dell once stood out in this regard, but has not kept up with it's namesake IMHO.

Check out NotebookCheck.net for a great resource on laptops - https://www.notebookcheck.net/Mobile-Graphics-Cards-Benchmark-List.844.0.html

Edited by Justin Montoya

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Justin, thanks for your patience with my basic questions.  I will check out some other brands.  I think you are right about Dell.  Though I love their 4yr support packages.  We'll see.

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No worries.  The buyers guide on Notebookcheck is extremely handy as well - https://www.notebookcheck.net/Notebookcheck-s-Top-10-Multimedia-Notebooks.98608.0.html

One last thing worth mentioning would be to look out for so called '4k' screens on laptops.  While these screens offer lots of pixels, they do so on a very small screen, which can lead to strained eyes, or forcing the user WAY too close to the screen.  Resolution should match screen size.  This is why smaller TVs (under 50in) still look good at lower resolutions as well.

When you are getting close to making a decision, it's always worth a quick trip to Best Buy to compare these sort of things in person.  They even price match Amazon now...

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