Jump to content
AutoDesSys Forums
Spacer

Interior design advice

Recommended Posts

Hi,

 

I am making interior renderings, but  there is no interior designer. So it's up to me to  choose and place everything. I am not good at this...or not used to it, having done mostly exterior renderings.

 

Also the client asks for certain furniture... so it's mix and match. 

 

Any advice on this image. (I am pretty sure the red chairs are too red, but client asked for them....)

 

Thanks in advance. Info:

 

- the entry is at left.

-this is a noisy low res test

-the beams are very old oak, I had them origianly natural varnished wood, but someone pointed out that  current style would have them painted white, which I think is ok.

 

 

thanks in advance-

 

Peter

 

 

post-9808-0-03309300-1521288142_thumb.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi

Can't really give you advice about layout as that's a personal choice with the client and consideration of their requirement.

 

With respect to rendering: you may be aware of alpha channel rendering; if not this could be useful.

 

For initial presentations

1) separate clients requirements and your additions onto different layers.... maybe even breakdown and create further layers for individual items.

2) the static agreed items can be on your background layer

3) render the none agreed (changeable items and positions) on alpha channel layers

4) Use background layer as base and compile alpha layers into background scene using photoshop.

 

This method saves extensive time rendering (render main scene once for each view) composite rendering items to each view can be much quicker, than re-render of whole scenes multiple times.

So a simplistic example... the client may look at your image and want change to the color of sofa's, the carpet and place a tv where the large picture is.

This would only require a re-render of the new items and color changes on an alpha.... add those alpha layers to your existing base background base image in ps.

It's a very quick method of offering the client multiple options and tweaks without long render times.

Very useful method on very large scenes and presentations where change requirements are a likely or extensive.

 

Hope that helps.

Martin

 

Edited by Martin Malinski

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Martin,

 

Never thought of that, thanks!

 

Where do I attribute where/how each individual item is rendered? (say I want to render a chair component individually as you propose?)

 

I am using Maxwell.

 

 

Best-

 

Peter

 

 

 

Edited by Spacer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi,

 

Suggest you try it out; just render a simple scene. create new layer and drop a cube or sphere in. switch your scene layers off and render the new layer as an alpha. Then test doing a composition in ps ....

 

I use this method for initial and working presentations to plow thru' options .... for the final presentations you could render the scene as a whole (unless it's a massive scene) just switch on all your layers ...

 

Method:

Decide on what is fixed and position on layers.... label those layers within a group for your 'base' render. (it might only be the cieling, walls, windows and doors) Set the individual scenes you require and render them. (normal 2 or 3 scenes is adequate)

 

1. Add new layers for any proposed items and position items in the scene on layers as required.

 

2. Switch off (hide) the base layer group

 

3. Select the layer (or layers) of the proposed objects and render as alpha. (create as many alpha layers or groups as you want)

 

4. The alpha just has the visible objects rendered on what seems to be black; but actually the reflections/shadows of the scene are retained in the alpha data....

 

5. When deciding on alpha grouping, you should also consider the perspective depth... so choose and label your alpha's based on foreground to background, so as to cut down on any overlaps of objects ....issues still can easily be erased in ps but if you plan alpha's correctly there will be no requirement to erase any background>foreground overlaps.

 

6. Open base image in ps import alpha layers (as alpha) -import in order of background to foreground to avoid object overlaps-

 

7. Make sure you render all images at same render setting size so they match in ps. (easier to compile)

 

As the client approves items you can add them to the Background render in ps....(so your background image builds toward final requirement as objects are approved).... You can even use this image as a reference with the client of approvals

 

When you have most items approved you can do final complete renders in Maxwell.

 

Maxwell allows for alpha channel rendering (I don't use Maxwell) but the principle is the same....  assume you can set layers to be rendered as alpha channel and follow the same logic to make a composite.

 

You may even be able to render the background in Maxwell, then use renderzone for the alpha object layers ....as long as you use formZ scenes. (never tried it)

 

 

It all sounds complicated.... but it's not ;) it really can save on time. .... Can be really useful on very large projects (or if your computer is limited) as you can break the project into smaller parts and then easily assemble the parts into a final composite image.

 

Martin

Edited by Martin Malinski

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Peter,

 

I am an architect and interior architect. From my point of view the client should understand architectural / interior design as a concept. If they understand a concept, then color or kind of chair makes no sence, they are free to choose any and will always fit in the concept. If you are on the level of decorating then Martin’s suggestion is very usefull, it saves time, because the client doubt and the only thing you can do is show alternative colors or chair models...

 

I could help as a conceptuel architect, but I doubt your client is willing to pay for this approuch. You could suggest them and we could start working together. ????

 

I wish you succes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Hugo,

 

thanks for the advice. when i accepting this rendering job it never struck me that a design would be needed to place furniture. Man, have i paid dearly for that error- missed deadline, angry client, endless hours + the joys of component instability.

 

I sort of doubt my client will go for adesigner, but thanks for the offer. Io know that even a quick sketch early on and  some references for furniture would have saved alot of time.

 

Cheers-

 

Peter

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One assumes if the client wanted to do anymore than space plan and decorate they would have employed an Architect, Interior Designer and/or a Project Manager to organize the Project; Consultants and Contractors .....

 

I happen to be Internationally experienced in all three roles ;) plus contracting. .... (but then I'm a little old in the tooth at 60+)

 

Spacer should be able to manage this small project just fine. It looks a good project for gaining experience on......Especially the importance of building a  client relationship ;) 

 

Good luck. 

 

Martin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Martin!

 

you're a comedian as well!!  :D this client will NEVER call me back...But thanks for the advice.

 

Still I want to do a good job.

 

Definitely I missed the boat on this one. 

 

Peter

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Martin,

Building up a relationship with a client is always ok, but on the other hand you have to communicate to the client what is important. Is it money driven or is it good architectural design. The whole success of the project depends on that difference. Anyway, i wish Peter all the succes he needs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Peter,

 

If you missed the boat, why not tell your client: hey, i am ready with this!

 

Go for the better client!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hugo,

 

The issue for me was simple.... we are on a software forum. I would not dream of making comment or advising on Architecture, interior design or project management without any relationship or knowledge of the project, contract or client.

 

''Can't really give you advice about layout as that's a personal choice with the client and consideration of their requirement.''

 

Tried to assist based on the use of FormZ; offer techniques that are common if you are in Arch' & Interiors.. ....I'm not about to comment or critique on concept, colors, materials, f&f, layout, change, approval, or any other design requirement or technique..... 

 

Spacer; no problem, glad you're still smiling :) . You missed the boat this time, but you've gained a couple of lessons for next time. ....

 

Martin

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×