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Creating model of "ribbon" from images


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#1 Gyro

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 01:29 AM

Hi All,

I'm working on building a model of a giant 40m ribbon sculpture for an artist.

Other than 3D scanning the model I'm wondering if it can be created from pictures of the model.

I have a scale model which I have photographed and traced paths over it in Illustrator which I can import into Formz but unsure if I will be able to create a usable file by lining up the points of the paths in a 3D space.

Or am I better to try and match the image by creating a 2D flat ribbon and manipulating it using the reshape tools.

 

Any guidance would be appreciated.

 

Thanks in advance Andrew

www.gyro.co.nz

Link to the previous work we build this year.

Judy Millar: Rock Drop | Auckland Art Gallery

and another 

Judy Darragh: Limbo | Auckland Art Gallery

Form•Z was used in the design and build of both these works.

Attached Thumbnails

  • Ribbon Images.jpg


#2 Des

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 02:48 AM

Hi Gyro, I think that can easily be created in FormZ. I would skip the illustrator step altogether, just use the Billboard tool to place the photos.

The plan in the XY plane (plan), the elevation in the ZX plane (front) and scale and line them up for example.

Use the bezier or spline to trace the paths and manipulate them into position. Then either loft them together or use a two paths sweep.

For clean geometry, make the paths have the same amount of control points and same direction.

 

 

Des



#3 snow

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 08:03 AM

I agree with Des.  Trace the outlines in formZ using any of the spline tools, then use the curve reconstruct tool to make sure the opposing sides are the same degree and same number of points.  another method after doing this is to use one of the nurbs surfaces tools to complete the surface.  and lastly, thicken the surface.


Edited by snow, 06 October 2017 - 08:04 AM.


#4 chrisd

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Posted 06 October 2017 - 10:17 AM

Hi Gyro,

 

AGI Photoscan might be a solution but it does require a lot of pictures to build a quality model. If the model only needs to be a reference you might be able get away with fewer pics. Shiny or reflective surfaces can be problematic. Spraying with dulling spray or paint can help with that although that in many cases that would not be an option.


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#5 Bo Atkinson

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Posted 09 October 2017 - 05:01 AM

Yes formZ alone with, which Match View or with View Angle, also Underlay and especially using GoPro or fish eye camera shots, linearly arranged shots. Front, side and bottom up views, to get all turns.



#6 Gyro

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 11:33 PM

Hi Gyro,

 

AGI Photoscan might be a solution but it does require a lot of pictures to build a quality model. If the model only needs to be a reference you might be able get away with fewer pics. Shiny or reflective surfaces can be problematic. Spraying with dulling spray or paint can help with that although that in many cases that would not be an option.

Hi Chris,

I've used Photoscan in the past and thinking it may be the line of least resistance!

 

 

Thanks for your input.

 

Andrew



#7 Gyro

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Posted 13 October 2017 - 12:22 AM

I agree with Des.  Trace the outlines in formZ using any of the spline tools, then use the curve reconstruct tool to make sure the opposing sides are the same degree and same number of points.  another method after doing this is to use one of the nurbs surfaces tools to complete the surface.  and lastly, thicken the surface.

 

 

Hi Gyro, I think that can easily be created in FormZ. I would skip the illustrator step altogether, just use the Billboard tool to place the photos.

The plan in the XY plane (plan), the elevation in the ZX plane (front) and scale and line them up for example.

Use the bezier or spline to trace the paths and manipulate them into position. Then either loft them together or use a two paths sweep.

For clean geometry, make the paths have the same amount of control points and same direction.

 

 

Des

Hi there,

I've gone down this path before posting to the forum, what I'm finding difficult is to keep the ribbon parallel over it's length.

Wondering I'm better off inserting multiple single paths at a set length from one of the edges perpendicular to the edge and using the rotate tool the align to the second edge and perform a Nurbs Blend between each path.

Is it possible to add a line perpendicular the curved edge?

 

Thanks in advance Andrew



#8 Des

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Posted 13 October 2017 - 04:44 AM

Yes, after thinking about this, I think you are correct. I believe the curved surface effect (although it's made of straight lines in the loft) is from the double ruled surface (see image).

Also, your ribbon is tapered at the ends, it forces the points to compress over the length of the ribbon, which will create the curving instead of the straight parallel surface that you want.

So I think you are correct by suggesting inserting intermediate paths.

Say you do this, reconstruct the surface so it has a central line between the two paths, extract the central path. Reconstruct that one so it's length is longer so that you can trim the tapered ends later?

 

I'm up to my follicles at the moment, so I can't experiment with it. But please post your tests.

 

Maybe Support can chime in on this?

 

Des

 

DoubleRuledSurface.jpg



#9 chrisd

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Posted 13 October 2017 - 09:57 AM

Hi Chris,

I've used Photoscan in the past and thinking it may be the line of least resistance!

 

 

Thanks for your input.

 

Andrew

 

The lack of thickness will make it difficult to capture the edge. This would make it difficult to get a crisp edge regardless of scanning method. I'm not sure what would help aside from fitting a piece of thicker material to it. Maybe putting some tape in spots along the edge might help?
 






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